Dior and Deidaa: Lessons Learnt

“We were leaving a period of war, of uniforms, of soldier women with shoulders like boxers”. “I turned them into flowers, with soft shoulders, blooming bosoms, waist slim… and skirts opening up like blossoms. ” Christian Dior, thus summarised his ‘New Look’. Continue reading Dior and Deidaa: Lessons Learnt

Winter 2017 – what is in and what is out

As I was soaking up the sun this morning, I was painfully aware this sunshine will not last for long.  Winter 2017 is just round the corner. Most of us need to revamp our wardrobes every season – but how? How do we know what is in and what is out? What is this year’s fashion and what is recycled from last year? How do we separate wheat from chaff? Here are a few Deidaatips for Winter 2017.

1. WINTER 2017 Stock up on basics:

Winter is about utilitarian garments. Stock up on bomber jackets, trench coats and puffas. Try off beat colours like baby pink and pastel blue. Top up with scarves, beanies and gloves.

2. Include oodles of pink:

Invest in a pink pashmina, wear designer silk scarves splattered with hot pink fuchsias.

3.Wear velvet:

Yes, velvet. This vintage fabric is back with a bang. If you are unsure about wearing velvet in your main garments – after all, velvet is shiny and makes you look bigger than you are – wear it in accessories. You can’t go wrong with a black velour clutch bag, embellished with diamantes’.

4. The small bag returns:

Totes have been replaced with mini bags or small bags. Remember winter 2017 is ruled by the ’80s. Flaunt your bling. Carry a small bag covered with rhinestones. Wear it as a sling bag or carry it as a clutch.

5. Wear your stripes:

Loose, flowing garments in bold stripes is what the fashion pundits are excited about. Wear a bold black and white striped kaftan with leggings or tights. Another ’80s icon, leggings and tights are back. As the mercury dips, top up the kaftan with a puffa jacket. I love my puffas and can be guilt free about wearing puffas in winter 2017. The humble puffa is fashionable all of a sudden. Again, the trick lies in trying new colours like purple in puffas.
Opt for greenery, ’80s shoulders, flower power, shimmer and pleats. Follow deidaatips for fashion trends in winter 2017 and beat the winter chill with new found confidence.
Share your winter fashion secrets with Deidaa. Seek expert advice. Post comments and suggestions on deidaablog, http://www.facebook.com/deidaaforum, http://www.twitter.com/deidaa, gram Deidaa @deidaafashiononline, tag Deidaa #deidaafashionline. Each post, comment or regram is rewarded with a couponcode for 10% discount across all products at deidaashop.

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How David Hockney influences Deidaa’s design aesthetic

David Hockney, painter, photographer, stage designer and printmaker, is one of the most colourful and influential figures in the contemporary world of art.

Deidaa, a long time Hockney loyalist, has learnt the following lessons from David Hockney’s life and art.

Lesson 1 – David Hockney – eye for colour

An exponent of pop art, Hockney is is known for his use of vivid colours and bold patterns. Deidaa shares Hockney’s love of colour. Deidaa’s digital printed kaftans, designer silk scarves, floral maxi dresses and beach bags celebrate colour. Ranging from vivid reds to cobalt blue, hot pinks to primrose yellow, Deidaa’s kaftans, scarves, maxi dresses and beach bags, resonate Hockney’s colourful palette.

Lesson 2 – David Hockney – ahead of time

David Hockney has embraced new technology like polaroids, iphone and ipad apps. Following Hockney’s footsteps, Deidaa balances artisan crafted items like crochet kaftans with latest technologies like digital printing.

Lesson 3 – David Hockney – embracing nature

Hockney regularly revisited his native Yorkshire in England. He captured the local surroundings initially from memory and in later years continued to paint the countryside en plein air. Deidaa captures the magic of Australian flora and fauna in her designer silk scarves.

Lesson 4 – David Hockney – prolific and diverse

Hockney is 79 years old. He continues to create hundreds of prints, portraits, photomontages, collages and landscapes using diverse mediums like oil, acrylic and digital media. Team@deidaa research and travel continuously, working with artisan communities, incorporating handcrafted details in kaftans, bags and scarves, thus throwing a life line to artisan crafts and communities. Like Hockney, Deidaa embraces diversity, working across ehnicities and lifestyle choices.

Lesson 5 – David Hockney –  influencing other designers

David Hockney is a dapper man. He is a style icon with his signature glasses, mismatched socks, bow ties, stripes and Saville Row suits. Hockney and his paintings continue to influence fashion designers, old and new. Yves Saint Laurent, Michael Kors, Paul Smith, Burberry and Australia’s own Kym Ellery have borrowed from the man and his works, now and then. In 1985, Hockney was commissioned to design the cover and pages for the French edition of Vogue. Like Hockney, Deidaa continues to be instrumental in shaping the minds of young designers. Deidaa offers emerging designers a platform to showcase their designs. Designers are handpicked on the basis of quality and innovation.

Like Hockney, Deidaa is on a relentless journey of innovation, experimenting with mediums old and new, striking that fine balance between time honoured artisan skills and mind blowing new technology.

For images of David Hockney’s artwork, please follow Deidaa at www.facebook.com/deidaaforum and @deidaafashiononline on Instagram

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Get your regifting karma right

Holidays are over, a new year has dawned upon us with promises of new beginnings. A niggling problem persists. After every Christmas, most of us end up with gifts we have no use for. Do we regift these unwanted gifts? On an emotional level, using the gifts is the least we can do for someone who has spent time, money and effort to source these gifts for us. Rationally thinking, regifting is not such a sin it is made out to be. Regifting is recycling. It minimises waste. One man’s trash can be another man’s treasure.The digital printed kaftan you received as a Christmas gift may be too flamboyant for you. It is an ideal regift for your cousin in Cairns who would love some colourful throw overs for bathers.

How do you get your regifting karma right?

Thoughtful regifting:

Think if your regift will be useful to the receiver. The long floral maxi dress is a little too long for you. Perhaps your lissom cousin has the right body shape for it. You are a homebody, while your bff is an avid party goer. She will use the beaded clutch bag more than you would.

Regifting outside the same circle of friends or family:

Regifting within the same circle of friends or family has bruised many friendships and created bad blood between family members. If you regift your mother in law the designer silk scarf she bought for you after intense research, you will no longer be her favourite daughter – in – law.

Regifting new items:

Do not regift an item if you have used it. Remove tell tale signs that may give away your little secret. Re wrap the regift in new packaging. Look carefully for gift tags and personal notes. These have an uncanny knack of surfacing at the most inopportune moments. Come clean if you are caught in the act. Explain to the original giver or the receiver why the gift was not right for you but why it could be right for some one else.

Regifting to charity:

Spread some cheer for the less fortunate.  Regift to charity. Be mindful of the fact that charities are not dumping grounds.Do not give anything that is unusable. Unfortunately, charities have to spend time and money to get rid of dumped goods. These resources could be better used elsewhere.

Have a swap party:

How about a post Christmas girls’ night in? You could swap your unwanted gifts over cupcakes and matcha tea. Your child may have to wait for a few years to grow into the kids apron chef hat set she has received from her favourite aunt, but your friend’s daughter, who is a whiz kid in the kitchen, is the right size for it.

Follow a few simple rules and regift with confidence.

Have you been regifted your own gift? Share your thoughts on regifting with Deidaa.

Fashion Trends 2017 Natural Handmade Multicultural

Fashion Trends 2017 Natural Handmade Multicultural

The end of year holidays and New Year’s eve festivities have made way for a new dawn. We are in the new year and looking forward to new beginnings.

What is your fashion mantra in 2017? Follow 5 simple tips and you will be in sync with fashion trends 2017.

Go green:

Think organic.  Look at your veggie patch or the neighbourhood beach for inspiration. Colour your world with kale, sage, cobalt, azure, primrose and tangelo in 2017.

Embrace handmade:

If organic is making headlines, can handmade be far behind? Opt for artisan made – crochet kaftan dresses for women, macramé bra tops, beaded plus size kaftans and maxi dresses.

Earn your stripes:

Bold stripes rule the runways in 2017. This is good news for fashionistas. Stripes are naturally flattering. They add height and subtract weight. If you are already tall, you may minimise the linear effect with a combination of narrow and wide black and white striped kaftan.

Reinvent the ‘80s:

Flaunt the baubles. Drown in ruffles and flounces, sparkle in spandex leggings and neon sweaters.  Carry beaded clutch bags unabashedly adorned with sequins and super sized rhinestones.

Go pint size:

Talking of bags, the other bag that is making waves is the ‘mini’. This ‘mini’ bag barely has room for a lipstick or two. It is the minimal accessory with the maximum effect.

So what is out? Go easy on skinny jeans. Replace white sneakers with flamboyant athleisure shoes. Kitten heels make a comeback. The cold shoulder look makes way for cut away sleeves or the one shoulder silhouette. Corsetry takes a backseat. Relaxed elegance makes its presence felt.

Stay tuned for exciting posts on fashion trends, events, party wear, race wear and beach wear tips. Are we missing something? Can we do better? Don’t forget to send in your suggestions and comments.

 

Free Express Post Australia Post

Free Express Post

Do you still have to do last minute Christmas gift shopping? It is not too late yet. Shop with confidence at Deidaa. On request Deidaa offers free express post from 18.12.2016 to 22.12.2016. In addition, Deidaa offers a free gift wrapping service. On request, Deidaa will wrap your gifts with free recycled, handmade paper and send it to your designated address. Deidaa takes the stress out of gift shopping this Christmas. Follow Deidaa’s giftopedia on http://www.facebook.com/deidaaforum or @deidaafashiononline on instagram to cure your giftophobia (fear of giving and receiving gifts). Read deidaablog for gift buying and wrapping ideas! SWtill stranded? SOS Deidaa at info@deidaa.com.au

Handmade Textiles

Handmade textiles Introduction:

Years of working with artisans has not quenched my thirst for handmade textiles. On the contrary, everytime I watch artisans work their magic, I yearn for more interaction with artisans.

Handmade textiles Ikat:

Recently, I had an opportunity to observe Balinese Ikat weavers at work. To those unfamiliar with Ikat, it is one of the strongest and most complicated textile techniques. Artisans across the world are connected by a common thread. It is no wonder then, that artisans in three countries are skilled in the art of Ikat weaving, namely, India, Indonesia and Thailand. Ikat textiles are characterised by their geometric patterns. These patterns are formed by pre – dyeing the yarn in multiple colours to mathematical precision. Geometric patterns form when these yarns are woven on a shuttle loom. A small mistake in the pre – dyeing process can result in the final pattern being skewed. In single Ikat fabric, the weft thread alone is pre – dyed in multiple colours, while the warp thread is dyed in single colour. In double Ikat fabric, both warp and weft yarns are pre – dyed in multiple colours. Double Ikat weaving is a highly specialised textile technique, practised in India alone. Ikat textiles are put to multiple uses. They are used for making scarves and pocket squares. They are sewn into beautiful kaftans and dresses.

Handmade textiles Batik:

The art of batik painting is widely practised in Bali. Batik  belongs to the genre of resist dyeing and printing. In resist printing, motifs are covered with wax (Indonesia), starch or mud (India and Africa) and the covered fabric is dipped in dye. The dyed fabric is then washed or steamed to get rid of the resisting agent. Batik was popularised in India by the Nobel laureate poet, Rabindranath Tagore. However, while Indonesians use the fine nibbed pen or tjanting and geometric blocks called tjaps made out of brass, Indians use paint brush and wooden hand blocks. Persian influence, with its curvilinear floral motifs, is abundant in Indian block printing.

Batik sarongs, shirts and dresses add value to a textile connoisseur’s wardrobe. While buying batik products, look for authentic handmade textiles and do not be fooled by cheap mass produced imitations.

Artisans world wide, display amazing depth, dexterity and diversity. We need to foster these handmade textiles so that our children and their children continue to be enthralled by their beauty and grace.

Please follow us @deidaafashiononline on Instagram or like www.facebook.com/deidaaforum for related photographs and videos

Of Horses and Hats… Edgar Degas

Of Horses and Hats… Edgar Degas

Winter 2016 is officially over. Spring is finally at our doorstep, bringing in its wake the Spring Racing Festival. Spring 2016 coincides with a retrospective of Edgar Degas, a French Impressionist artist at the National Gallery of Victoria. Horse racing as a theme recurred in Degas’ work. Horse racing was a popular pastime of the bourgeoisie in the 19th century. Members of Parisian high society gathered at the racecourses, offering Degas an opportunity to study shapes and movement.

Degas collected fashion accessories. An array of headgear – bonnets, hairbands and bows, top and bowler hats, middle-eastern caps and wide brimmed sun hats adorn many characters of Degas’ paintings. Degas had a penchant for scarves. He catches ‘a Roman Beggar Woman’ wearing a plaid scarf in a pensive mood. He drapes a striking red shawl on his friend, Alice Vilette.

A full review of Degas’ new vision, coming soon on Deidaa.

Fashion Trends Spring Summer 2016

fashion trends Spring Summer 2016

As days become longer and nights warmer, as the barren cherry tree in my front yard begins to sprout new shoots, I can hear the footsteps of spring.

We all know reptiles molt or shed their external layer, but do we realise humans molt too? As we approach spring, we humans go through a molting process, shedding layers of winter clothes. Come spring – summer, we feel the need to explore new possibilities for our wardrobes, aka fashion trends Spring Summer 2016. What is making waves on the fashion runways this summer? What are the fashion pundits predicting? Will it be nature, will it be athleisure, will it be handcrafting or will it be a combination of all of these influences? How do you interpret these trends and adapt them to suit your persona, lifestyle and choice? Learn more in Deidaa’s next post on fashion trends Spring Summer 2016 and how to nail them.

Deidaatip – Dress like Olympians

 

Deidaatip – dress like Olympians

Since time immemorial, there has been a connection between fashion and Olympics. Athletes and what they wear at the Olympics, have been subjects of animated discussions on fashion forums. Olympians like Serena Williams, Usain Bolt and Australia’s very own Stephanie Rice are acknowledged fashion icons. Athletes are being increasingly used by apparel and lifestyle companies to promote their products.

Designers are being roped in to create Olympic uniforms, Stella McCartney for the British athletes and Ralph Lauren for their American counterparts. Athletes from Australia are wearing the traditional green and gold colours with chic accessories like gold scarves and ties. If you do not have access to the gold scarf, do not lose heart. You may pack a few hot numbers from Deidaa’s new range of Australia scarves, if you are lucky enough to travel to Rio to witness the Olympics. If not, you could join your mates at the local pub and enjoy Olympics on the big screen. Do not forget to wear one of Deidaa’s Australia scarves!

Full feature on fashion at Rio Olympics 2016 coming soon on Deidaa! Go Australia!